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Library OneSearch: Beyond the Basics

Your guide to using HTC's Library OneSearch tool.

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Use the tabs above for information on the following:

What is Advanced Search?

Nearly all search tools have an Advanced Search option which gives researchers much more control over what they find. 

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Advanced searches generally have Field Search options and other limits or search refinements to help researchers find specific results.

On This Page - Beyond the Basics

Beyond the Basics - Advanced SearchingArrow pointing down (clipart)

On this page you will find information on:

  • Using Advanced Search to Find Books
  • Using Advanced Search to Find Articles
  • Search Tips and Tricks

Advanced Search for Books

Using the Advanced Search to Find Books

To access the Advanced Books & More search page, click the Advanced Search: Books & More link from any OneSearch search results page (see screenshot below).

You can also get to the Advanced Book Search directly from this link: https://htc.mplus.mnpals.net/vufind/Search/Advanced.Advanced Search: Books & More link from OneSearch Search Results page

On the Advanced Books & More search page you can use the Field Search drop-down menus (to the right of the search boxes) to select where you want OneSearch to look for your keywords (i.e. look for my keywords in the Book title, in the Table of Contents, in the Subject headings, etc.).

You can also look up items by call number, collection, format, or set a year of publication date range.

Advanced Books & More Search Form. Field search drop-down menus and other limits highlighted.

Advanced Search for Articles

Using the Advanced Search to Find Articles

To access the Advanced Articles & More search page, click the Advanced Search: Articles & More link from any OneSearch search results page (see screenshot below).

You can also get to the Advanced Article Search directly from this link: https://htc.mplus.mnpals.net/vufind/Summon/Advanced

Advanced Search: Articles & More link

On the Advanced Articles & More search page you have many options to control how OneSearch finds your article results (see screenshot below).  You can use any of the following individually or combine them:

  • Easily enter individual keywords / keyphrases in separate search box.
  • Use the Field Search drop-down menus (to the right of the search boxes) to select where you want OneSearch to find your keywords (i.e. find my keywords in the Book title, in the Table of Contents, in the Subject headings, etc.).
  • Use the checkboxes to limit your search in various ways (i.e. find only full text articles, exclude newspaper articles, etc.).
  • Set a year of publication date range.

Advanced Articles & More search form, highlighting entering keywords in separate search boxes, field search drop-down menus, and other limits/search refinements.

Search Tips and Tricks

Search Tips and Tricks

Phrase Searching

OneSearch allows for phrase searching with the use of “ ”. The search “teacher education” will find results with that exact phrase.

Searching Specific Fields

The single search box in OneSearch will search across many fields automatically. For example, entering an ISBN, ISSN, or call number will bring back records related to those fields.

You can explicitly search a field using the field search drop-down menus (located just to the right of any search box). For example, if you type student success in a search box and select Title from the field search drop-down to the right of the search box - your search will find records with the words student and success in the title. 

Use quotation marks with this strategy to find records with exact phrases.  For example, if you type "student success" in a search box and select Title from the field search drop-down to the right of the search box - your search will find records with the exact phrase student success in the title

Searchable fields:

  • Title
  • Journal Title
  • Author
  • Subject
  • Call Number
  • ISBN/ISSN
  • Publisher
  • Series
  • Year of Publication
  • Table of Contents

Boolean Operators

OneSearch offers the following Boolean operations: AND, OR, and NOT.  

PLEASE NOTE: The operators must be written in ALL CAPS.

AND

By default, all terms in a search are combined with the AND operator.  This means searching economics Minnesota is the same as searching economics AND Minnesota.

This can be combined with phrase searching, such as "student success" AND "technical college."

OR

The OR operator will give you a larger results list by finding either word from your search. For example, microcircuits OR nanocircuits will return results that contain either of these keywords.

This can be combined with phrase searching, such as “teacher education” OR “educator training”.

NOT

To exclude items in OneSearch, use the NOT operator or the minus sign (-) before a term. The search animal NOT dog will exclude any results with the term dog from your search.  A search using the minus sign (-) instead of NOT would look like: animal -dog.

Wildcard Searches

The two wildcard characters recognized by OneSearch are the question mark (?) and the asterisk (*). 

The question mark (?) will match any one letter within a word.  For example, Ols?n will find both Olsen and Olson. 

The asterisk (*) will match zero or more characters within a word or at the end of a word.

Example 1: Using the asterisk within a word - A search for Ch*ter would match Charter, Character, and Chapter.

Example 2: Using the asterisk at the end of a word or partial word - A search for Temp* will match all suffixes, such as Temptation, Temple and Temporary.

Wildcards cannot be used as the first character of a search.